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CV gaitor HELP HELP HELP !!!!!!!!!


niki6969000
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Hi people,took front ns wheel to change pads,noticed grease everywhere. Checked CV and its split in several places.

I have to get it done tomorrow as i need it for work on mon.Anyone got any links i can go to as my Haines manual dont really help me. :nutter:

Edited by niki6969000
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they are fiddly very fiddly best technique i find is using the cone turn the gaiter inside out on the pre lubed cone and then pull it over, you find the spider thingy tool can split the boots as for the inner one, wouldn't know might just be easier buying second hand drive shaft with them on lol
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firstly, dont use the split universal gaitor kit shite as their produced primarily for absolute idiots and the brain dead enough to buy them, they fail quickly and dont do the job correctly in the fist place.

 

for the correct method you'll need:

 

inner & outer CV gaiters (easily and cheaply available at any motor factors)

a trolley jack and stand

a flat head screwdriver

wheel brace/spider

split ring pliers (tho these are not essential)

a good set of spanners

 

1, Jack up the appropriate side and place firmly on axle stand

 

2, remove appropriate road wheel

 

Now there are two ways of achieving the next section, both are similar, for the sake of clarity I will explain the CORRECT way.

 

3, unbolt the calliper from the bearing carrier and secure up out the way (tie wrapping it to the top of the spring will suffice, be careful not to stress the brake pipes to much)

 

4, Remove the central hub nut (22/24mm iirc)

 

5, remove the retaining pinch bolt the holds the carrier to the lower ball joint and prise the two apart.

 

6, pull the carrier away from the car to release it from the CV joint.

 

You should now be looking at the end of the Drive shaft with the cv joint connected to it

 

7, release the clip/strap/band that holds the inner CV joint gaiter and prise the joint away from the gearbox slightly.

 

8, draw the entire driveshaft outwards away from the car to release it from the gearbox inner joint.

 

At this point its possible to have over spill out of the gearbox connection point but unless the box is overfilled with oil the tilt of the car being on a onesided stand should be sufficient to avoid this, it is probably still advisable however to have a oil pan ready beneath just incase.

 

You should now have the entire driveshaft away from the car with both Inner and Outer CV joints still connected to its ends.

 

9, Cut away the offending gaiters (in your case both) and wipe clear as much of the remaining grease as possible.

 

10, looking carefully down the length of the driveshaft and into the rear of both CV joints (essentially were the shaft enters the joint) you will be able to discern a split ring which needs to be compressed.

 

11, compress the split ring and draw the shaft out of the joint at the same time release the shaft from the joint.(repeat for other end also)

 

you should now have the driveshaft and too cv joints separate.

 

12, before going any further thoroughly check the driveshaft spine teeth at its end for any sign of damage or access ware (usually displayed by twisting teeth), do the same with the CV spine teeth and moving surfaces were possible)

 

13, slide the appropriate new gaiters onto the requires ends of the drvieshaft,

 

14, without engaging the spilt rings slide the driveshafts ends back into the cv joints and estimate were you believe the smaller end of the gaiter will eventually sit.

 

15, once satisfied of their positions (remember to take into account that these gaiters will move alot so you should allow them to be somewhere close to their original natural shape when at rest on the car) tighten smaller driveshaft end clip/band etc

 

16, Empty the contents of the grease sachet supplied with the gaiters (alternatively CV grease is available at motor factors and Halfrauds)

 

A common error at this point is overfilling the gaiter, though most kits come with the correct amount typically required for the job some are supplied with an over abundance. A general rule I tend to follow is to stand the driveshaft upright (so its like a big demented egg cup) and add grease until it is upto the fourth from smaller end ring, This is usually just about right for grease level and will prevent the gaitor suffering premature failure due to over pressure inside the gaiter and ultimately bulging on tight driveshaft angle then rupturing in the future.

 

17, refit the cv joints to their appropriate ends by again compressing the rings until the cv locks in place firmly

 

18, lever the lip of the gaiters back into place over the and secure them with their bands, straps whatever

 

19, before attempting to refit the driveshaft make sure to give the lot a good backwards and forwards shake along its length to help the cold grease disperse slightly inside the gaiters (this will preempt any damage that might be caused later once the driveshaft is back on the car and you attempt to move it without the cv,s being adequately lubed)

 

20, refit everything in the reverse fashion with which you removed it

 

enjoy :D

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firstly, dont use the split universal gaitor kit shite as their produced primarily for absolute idiots and the brain dead enough to buy them, they fail quickly and dont do the job correctly in the fist place.

 

for the correct method you'll need:

 

inner & outer CV gaiters (easily and cheaply available at any motor factors)

a trolley jack and stand

a flat head screwdriver

wheel brace/spider

split ring pliers (tho these are not essential)

a good set of spanners

 

1, Jack up the appropriate side and place firmly on axle stand

 

2, remove appropriate road wheel

 

Now there are two ways of achieving the next section, both are similar, for the sake of clarity I will explain the CORRECT way.

 

3, unbolt the calliper from the bearing carrier and secure up out the way (tie wrapping it to the top of the spring will suffice, be careful not to stress the brake pipes to much)

 

4, Remove the central hub nut (22/24mm iirc)

 

5, remove the retaining pinch bolt the holds the carrier to the lower ball joint and prise the two apart.

 

6, pull the carrier away from the car to release it from the CV joint.

 

You should now be looking at the end of the Drive shaft with the cv joint connected to it

 

7, release the clip/strap/band that holds the inner CV joint gaiter and prise the joint away from the gearbox slightly.

 

8, draw the entire driveshaft outwards away from the car to release it from the gearbox inner joint.

 

At this point its possible to have over spill out of the gearbox connection point but unless the box is overfilled with oil the tilt of the car being on a onesided stand should be sufficient to avoid this, it is probably still advisable however to have a oil pan ready beneath just incase.

 

You should now have the entire driveshaft away from the car with both Inner and Outer CV joints still connected to its ends.

 

9, Cut away the offending gaiters (in your case both) and wipe clear as much of the remaining grease as possible.

 

10, looking carefully down the length of the driveshaft and into the rear of both CV joints (essentially were the shaft enters the joint) you will be able to discern a split ring which needs to be compressed.

 

11, compress the split ring and draw the shaft out of the joint at the same time release the shaft from the joint.(repeat for other end also)

 

you should now have the driveshaft and too cv joints separate.

 

12, before going any further thoroughly check the driveshaft spine teeth at its end for any sign of damage or access ware (usually displayed by twisting teeth), do the same with the CV spine teeth and moving surfaces were possible)

 

13, slide the appropriate new gaiters onto the requires ends of the drvieshaft,

 

14, without engaging the spilt rings slide the driveshafts ends back into the cv joints and estimate were you believe the smaller end of the gaiter will eventually sit.

 

15, once satisfied of their positions (remember to take into account that these gaiters will move alot so you should allow them to be somewhere close to their original natural shape when at rest on the car) tighten smaller driveshaft end clip/band etc

 

16, Empty the contents of the grease sachet supplied with the gaiters (alternatively CV grease is available at motor factors and Halfrauds)

 

A common error at this point is overfilling the gaiter, though most kits come with the correct amount typically required for the job some are supplied with an over abundance. A general rule I tend to follow is to stand the driveshaft upright (so its like a big demented egg cup) and add grease until it is upto the fourth from smaller end ring, This is usually just about right for grease level and will prevent the gaitor suffering premature failure due to over pressure inside the gaiter and ultimately bulging on tight driveshaft angle then rupturing in the future.

 

17, refit the cv joints to their appropriate ends by again compressing the rings until the cv locks in place firmly

 

18, lever the lip of the gaiters back into place over the and secure them with their bands, straps whatever

 

19, before attempting to refit the driveshaft make sure to give the lot a good backwards and forwards shake along its length to help the cold grease disperse slightly inside the gaiters (this will preempt any damage that might be caused later once the driveshaft is back on the car and you attempt to move it without the cv,s being adequately lubed)

 

20, refit everything in the reverse fashion with which you removed it

 

enjoy :D

THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR ADVICE ... :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :thumb: :thumb: , all sorted

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firstly, dont use the split universal gaitor kit shite as their produced primarily for absolute idiots and the brain dead enough to buy them, they fail quickly and dont do the job correctly in the fist place.

 

for the correct method you'll need:

 

inner & outer CV gaiters (easily and cheaply available at any motor factors)

a trolley jack and stand

a flat head screwdriver

wheel brace/spider

split ring pliers (tho these are not essential)

a good set of spanners

 

1, Jack up the appropriate side and place firmly on axle stand

 

2, remove appropriate road wheel

 

Now there are two ways of achieving the next section, both are similar, for the sake of clarity I will explain the CORRECT way.

 

3, unbolt the calliper from the bearing carrier and secure up out the way (tie wrapping it to the top of the spring will suffice, be careful not to stress the brake pipes to much)

 

4, Remove the central hub nut (22/24mm iirc)

 

5, remove the retaining pinch bolt the holds the carrier to the lower ball joint and prise the two apart.

 

6, pull the carrier away from the car to release it from the CV joint.

 

You should now be looking at the end of the Drive shaft with the cv joint connected to it

 

7, release the clip/strap/band that holds the inner CV joint gaiter and prise the joint away from the gearbox slightly.

 

8, draw the entire driveshaft outwards away from the car to release it from the gearbox inner joint.

 

At this point its possible to have over spill out of the gearbox connection point but unless the box is overfilled with oil the tilt of the car being on a onesided stand should be sufficient to avoid this, it is probably still advisable however to have a oil pan ready beneath just incase.

 

You should now have the entire driveshaft away from the car with both Inner and Outer CV joints still connected to its ends.

 

9, Cut away the offending gaiters (in your case both) and wipe clear as much of the remaining grease as possible.

 

10, looking carefully down the length of the driveshaft and into the rear of both CV joints (essentially were the shaft enters the joint) you will be able to discern a split ring which needs to be compressed.

 

11, compress the split ring and draw the shaft out of the joint at the same time release the shaft from the joint.(repeat for other end also)

 

you should now have the driveshaft and too cv joints separate.

 

12, before going any further thoroughly check the driveshaft spine teeth at its end for any sign of damage or access ware (usually displayed by twisting teeth), do the same with the CV spine teeth and moving surfaces were possible)

 

13, slide the appropriate new gaiters onto the requires ends of the drvieshaft,

 

14, without engaging the spilt rings slide the driveshafts ends back into the cv joints and estimate were you believe the smaller end of the gaiter will eventually sit.

 

15, once satisfied of their positions (remember to take into account that these gaiters will move alot so you should allow them to be somewhere close to their original natural shape when at rest on the car) tighten smaller driveshaft end clip/band etc

 

16, Empty the contents of the grease sachet supplied with the gaiters (alternatively CV grease is available at motor factors and Halfrauds)

 

A common error at this point is overfilling the gaiter, though most kits come with the correct amount typically required for the job some are supplied with an over abundance. A general rule I tend to follow is to stand the driveshaft upright (so its like a big demented egg cup) and add grease until it is upto the fourth from smaller end ring, This is usually just about right for grease level and will prevent the gaitor suffering premature failure due to over pressure inside the gaiter and ultimately bulging on tight driveshaft angle then rupturing in the future.

 

17, refit the cv joints to their appropriate ends by again compressing the rings until the cv locks in place firmly

 

18, lever the lip of the gaiters back into place over the and secure them with their bands, straps whatever

 

19, before attempting to refit the driveshaft make sure to give the lot a good backwards and forwards shake along its length to help the cold grease disperse slightly inside the gaiters (this will preempt any damage that might be caused later once the driveshaft is back on the car and you attempt to move it without the cv,s being adequately lubed)

 

20, refit everything in the reverse fashion with which you removed it

 

enjoy :D

THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR ADVICE ... :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :thumb: :thumb: , all sorted

just i comment i think you willl need to expand the circlip otherwise good advice :thumb:

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just i comment i think you willl need to expand the circlip otherwise good advice :thumb:

 

actually, Im pretty sure they have to be compressed around the driveshaft to release the circlip/spit ring from its groove in the inner surface of the CV joint.

 

as stated,

10, looking carefully down the length of the driveshaft and into the rear of both CV joints (essentially were the shaft enters the joint) you will be able to discern a split ring which needs to be compressed.

 

It is off course possible that Im confusing the ford one with a vauxhall one I recently did, but that can be discerned pretty quickly once the driveshaft is out anyway.

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just i comment i think you willl need to expand the circlip otherwise good advice :thumb:

 

actually, Im pretty sure they have to be compressed around the driveshaft to release the circlip/spit ring from its groove in the inner surface of the CV joint.

 

as stated,

10, looking carefully down the length of the driveshaft and into the rear of both CV joints (essentially were the shaft enters the joint) you will be able to discern a split ring which needs to be compressed.

 

It is off course possible that Im confusing the ford one with a vauxhall one I recently did, but that can be discerned pretty quickly once the driveshaft is out anyway.

circlip stays in cv joint im pretty sure never tried compressing it though always used thin screwdriver and twisted it to release it :thumb:

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